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January 8, 2018

Start Date and TimeEvent DetailsEvent Organizer(s)

Monday, January 08, 2018

All Day LIFT Exhibition Series: Unobstructed Beauty (Multi-Day Event)

This year, the LIFT series features three female painters from the Waterloo Region: Lauren Judge, Marion R. Anderson, and Anne Filiatrault. Each artist shares a narrative that invites viewers to reflect on how we perceive and experience our surrounding environment.

The LIFT microgalleries are located on floors 4-6 of the Waterloo campus Library.

  • Library
  • Robert Langen Gallery
  • Robert Langen Gallery
  • All Day C. Elizabeth Best: Nelson Small Legs Junior & Going Back Woman Exhibition (Multi-Day Event)

    This exhibition by C. Elizabeth Best explores modern Indigenous identity through her art practice and academic thesis work. See her artist statement below for a detailed description.

    On 16 May 1976, a young AIM activist killed himself in protest of the mishandling of Indigenous affairs by the Canadian federal government.

    This series of paintings complement my Master’s thesis. I made these pieces in tandem with my academic work. Despite the distance of 40 years, I mourned the loss of the young AIM activist. It wasn’t until I made a painting in his honour that I felt I could process this tragedy outside of myself.

    My second painting, the pink and turquoise rabbit, is an amalgamation of my own identity. Identity plays a central role in my thesis and this theme flowed naturally into the art I made during the past academic year.

    The series of three represent the main chapters of my paper. When I think about my thesis, bits and pieces float in and out of focus. I tried to capture that feeling with this series by using my notes to produce a visual representation of my thesis.

    This series represents the process I went through to understand the material I was reading and writing about. I think it is important for academics to experiment with different ways of presenting their work. Expression through art is how I have chosen to present my academic work to a varied audience. For more information, please see my thesis, Writing Activism: Indigenous Newsprint
    Media in the Era of Red Power, accessible through the Laurier Library.

  • Library
  • All Day Penelope Stewart: Thicket Mixed Media Installation (Multi-Day Event)

    Thicket features three haptic garden spaces created in the gallery. Comprised of an installation of 12,000 beeswax leaves, a collection of photographs and a series of beeswax cast sculptures - artist Penelope Stewart expands the visual field while creating a reciprocal conversation between image and object.

    For more information about Penelope Stewart's work, check out her website here.

  • Library
  • 10:00 AM - 11:20 AM Student Exchange Program information session
    Students interested in going on exchange must attend an information session before applying for the Student Exchange Program. All information sessions are drop-in sessions.
  • Laurier International
  • 12:30 PM - 2:00 PM From Identity to Precarity: Asylum, State Violence, and Alternative Horizons for Queer Citizenship

    From Identity to Precarity: Asylum, State Violence, and Alternative Horizons for Queer Citizenship

    A Talk with David K. Seitz

    This talk puts queer theory’s “subjectless critique” of identity to work in challenging the state’s biopolitical use of essential, authentic identities in asylum law and practice. It both builds on and departs from existing scholarship that calls on state actors to recognize a wider range of forms of gender and sexual diversity that make people vulnerable to persecution. By contrast, I investigate how the practices of “destination” countries produce asylums-seekers as dispossessed, deportable, precarious queers -- regardless of sexual identity or practice. Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork with asylum-seekers and their supporters in Toronto, I highlight the waiting room as one type of material and metaphorical space that produces asylum-seekers as liminal queer subjects. I argue that approaching queerness as precarity, rather than lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender identity or even sexual and gender diversity, provides alternative and expansive ethical horizons for queer and migration politics.

    Bio:

    David K. Seitz is a cultural geographer broadly interested in questions of desire, difference, and citizenship. He is assistant professor of cultural geography at Harvey Mudd College in Claremont, California, and contributes to the Intercollegiate Feminist Center and the American Studies program at the Claremont Colleges. His first book A House of Prayer for All People: Contesting Citizenship in a Queer Church was released in November by the University of Minnesota Press. An urban ethnography that centrally engages geographies of citizenship, queer of color critique, and psychoanalytic theory, the book examines the politics of urban, national and transnational solidarity at a large, predominantly LGBTQ church in Toronto.

    "Illustration by Annie Mok, courtesy of Mask magazine."

    Eat and discover with David K. Seitz!

    • 12:30-2 p.m.
    • BSIA Multipurpose Room 142
    • Free Event.

    A light lunch will be served.

    Please RSVP on Eventbrite: Identity

    Note: We will hold your registration until 12:20 p.m. After 12:20 p.m. your spot will be released to the wait list. A reminder that free parking is available on the streets surrounding the CIGI Campus, in the museum lot across Erb St. and in the Uptown Waterloo Plaza parking lots. Please enter the School through the Erb Street doors.

    For more information, please contact the organizer via email imrc.wlu@gmail.com. To receive email updates about future International Migration Research Centre Events please join our listserv by emailing us or visit our News and Events page at imrc.ca.

  • ~Other/Community Based
  • 12:45 PM - 12:55 PM Midday Pause

    Join us for a short time of prayer and reflection.

    Mondays: Reading the Earth Charter.

    Wednesdays: Reflections from various traditions in the seminary community.

    LOCATION: Waterloo Lutheran Seminary's temporary location at 190 Lester St., Waterloo.

  • Waterloo Lutheran Seminary

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